NIH: Office of Disease Prevention

Menu

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Annual Reports to Congress: Summary of High-Priority Research Gaps

The USPSTF also issues an annual report to Congress External Website Policy that identifies gaps in the evidence base and recommends priority areas that warrant further examination. Research gaps from the last three reports are listed below.

2016 Research Gaps (Clinical Preventive Services and Evidence Gaps Relating to Specific Populations that Deserve Further Research)

In the Sixth Annual Report to Congress on High Priority Evidence Gaps for Clinical Preventive Services External Website Policy, the USPSTF has identified six recent topics for which the current evidence was insufficient for the Task Force to make a recommendation. Future research in these areas, which are listed below, can help fill these gaps and would likely result in important new recommendations that will help to improve the health of Americans.

Clinical Preventive Services That Deserve Further Research:
  1. Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Young Children
  2. Screening for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea in Men
  3. Tobacco Smoking Cessation (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems) in Adults
  4. Vitamin Supplementation (Nutrients and Multivitamins) to Prevent Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease
  5. Aspirin Use to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer
  6. Screening for Skin Cancer in Adults
Evidence Gaps Relating to Specific Populations That Deserve Further Research:
  1. Screening for Autism Spectrum Disorder in Young Children
  2. Screening for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea in Men
  3. Tobacco Smoking Cessation (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems) in Adults
  4. Vitamin Supplementation (Nutrients and Multivitamins) to Prevent Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease
  5. Aspirin Use to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease and Colorectal Cancer
  6. Screening for Skin Cancer in Adults

2015 Research Gaps (Improving the Health of Women)

In the Fifth Annual Report to Congress on High-Priority Evidence Gaps for Clinical Preventive Services External Website Policy, the USPSTF has prioritized evidence gaps related to women's health. Research in these areas, which are listed below, would generate much-needed evidence for important new recommendations to improve the health and health care of women in the United States.

  1. Screening for Intimate Partner Violence, Illicit Drug Use, and Mental Health Conditions
  2. Screening for Thyroid Dysfunction
  3. Screening for Vitamin D Deficiency, Vitamin D and Calcium Supplementation to Prevent Fractures, and Screening for Osteoporosis
  4. Screening for Cancer
  5. Implementing Clinical Preventive Services

2014 Research Gaps (Improving the Health of Children and Adolescents)

In the Fourth Annual Report to Congress on High-Priority Evidence Gaps for Clinical Preventive Services External Website Policy, the USPSTF has prioritized evidence gaps related to the care of children and adolescents. More research in these areas, which are listed below, would result in important new knowledge that may improve the health and health care of young Americans, with lasting benefits through adulthood.

  1. Mental Health Conditions and Substance Abuse
  2. Obesity and Cardiovascular Health
  3. Behavior and Development
  4. Infectious Diseases
  5. Cancer Prevention
  6. Injury and Child Maltreatment
  7. Vision Disorders

2013 Research Gaps (Improving the Health of Older Adults)

In the Third Annual Report to Congress on High-Priority Evidence Gaps for Clinical Preventive Services External Website Policy, the USPSTF has prioritized evidence gaps related to the care of older adults. More research in these areas, which are listed below, would likely result in important new recommendations that will help improve the health and health care of older Americans.

  1. Screening for Cognitive Impairment and Dementia
  2. Screening for Physical and Mental Well-Being of Older Adults
  3. Preventing Falls and Fractures
  4. Screening for Vision and Hearing Problems
  5. Avoiding the Unintended Harms of Medical Procedures and Testing in Older Adults